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of the to u.s. patriot missile batteries as part of the nato effort to try to help protect our turkish allies against the threat of missiles from syria. even as we have asserted our strong and enduring commitment to the middle east, we are also renewing and expanding our engagement in the asia-pacific region. the core of our rebounds is modernizing our existing network of alliances and security partnerships throughout the region. and developing new security relations as well. over the past year, we reached major agreements with japan to realize our forces and jointly develop guam as a strategic hub. we afford to strengthen cooperation for the republic of korea, in space, in cyberspace, and intelligence. we begin a new marine rotational deployment to australia as well as increased air force cooperation. likewise, we are deepening our engagement and developing rotational deployment with allies and partners such as singapore and the philippines, and expanding our mil-to-mil dialogue and exchanges with china. we are also enhancing our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes reality
hospitalized since early december. senator inouye who served in the u.s. house in 1959 before being elected to the senate in 1962 was serving his ninth term in office after winning their reelection in 2010 was 75% of the vote. a winner of the distinguished service cross for heroism, senator inouye lost his right arm in combat during world war ii. he later received a medal of honor along with another number of japanese american soldiers. from bill clinton in 2000. here is a conversation with the senator from 2008. >>> welcome to the latest interview in the united states capitol historical society's series of oral history interviews to the economy former member of congress from connecticut and i am the president of the united states capitol and historical society. this interview with senator daniel inouye is part of a special series featuring asian-pacific members of congress. in these interviews current and fellow members have relived their memories of people, places and events that have shaped their public career. it is our hope that these recollections will provide listeners with a deeper
of the shares. the u.s. is on the head with an auction model based on the elegant simplicity of one course concept, marcus, not the whims of regulator specific to ensure productive and innovative use. i know from some of your testimony you have pointed out, especially some new commissioners the success the sec has had over the years that doing good auctions. however, we've learned overly prescriptive rules can lead to less than successful auction results. the fcc so uncovered the d block auction to lower the megahertz licensed for the prime brought in spectrum failed to garner more than a few token bids and those who are well below the true value of that very important spectrum. the fcc must avoid overly prescriptive option was the land market mechanisms and have a proven record of success. remember, the revenue generated in part to pay for the middle-class tax cut and extension of unemployment benefits will be used to help pay for the interoperable public safety broadband network and to fund the next jan 9/11 service and invest in public safety research and development. they failed to rai
just add something u.s. senator whitehouse said. we hauled out photographs of the national wildlife refuge. we are looking to the west here. it used to be a freshwater wetland refuge. now it's largely the bottom part is the delaware bay. there is a road in the top corner that comes west to east to delaware bay. that road is under water quite a bit of the time now. but he used to be you could drive towards the delaware bay and as you've got to the bank, there's a parking lot where people can park cars or trucks or whatever. there's no parking lot. he couldn't stand they are to the east of the parking lot used to be, to the right about 1:00 you can see a concrete rockers sticking up out of the water. that concrete bunker used to be 500 feet west. used to be 500 feet west. you hurt me here with tongue-in-cheek with stephen stills who want that something is happening here. but it is exact ways that clear. my hope is that others will see that, too. >> thank you him so much. it will cause senator gillibrand. we are so happy senator whitehouse just opened the door and were just thrilled th
to represent the nation's second largest state in the u.s. senate. kay came to washington ready to work. she established herself early on as a leader on transportation and nasa and as a fighter for lower taxes and smaller, smarter government. kay won a claim as an advocate for science and competitiveness, helped secure bipartisan support for the landmark america competes act, and she became known throughout the state for the close attention she paid to constituents. shortly after her election to the senate, kay began a tradition imitated by many others since of holding weekly constituent meetings over coffee whenever the senate's in session. the groups usually ranged in size from 100-150, and at any given coffee, you might come across families in bermuda shorts, bankers in pinstripes or college football players. over the years, kay has hosted about 50,000 people in her office through these coffees, but her attention to constituent service goes well beyond that. back home, she is one of the few politicians in texas who has actually visited all 254 counties, some of which are home to more catt
this year, when the state of florida sued the u.s. government for court determination of the preclearance under the voting rights act of 1965, preclearance of five counties, for discrimination, and further, sued the u.s. government by questioning the constitutionality of the 1965 voting rights act. in the discovery for that case, the testimony was taken of this former general counsel of the florida republican party. and what i would like you to know is this key individual who, with your permission, with the committee's permission i'd like to insert those documents in the record -- that his testimony, given in april, mr. mitchell said, and it's in the sworn testimony, that he was asked to draft the original version of the legislation that became the law. he was asked to drafted by republican party leaders, specifically after consultations with andy palmer, then the executive director of the florida gop, frank, head of the gop state house campaigns, and joel springer, head of the state senate, republican campaigns. and in early talks with executive director of the florida gop. and with this
12 years until president ronald reagan, a knitted him as an associate justice of the u.s. supreme court. he took his current seat in 1988. in nominating justice kennedy to the supreme court in 1987, president ronald reagan remarked that his career was a judge in the u.s. court of appeals for the ninth circuit as a constitutional law professor and in private practice was marked by the devotion to the simple straightforward principle but we are a government of law and not of men. during the more than three decades on the bench, justice kennedy has played an interpol role in the consideration and the decision of some of the most significant cases and serious constitutional alleges in the nation's history. he's been a staunch defender of the first amendment rights, individual liberty against government intrusion and federalism. these are qualities of the constitutional series and we are honored to have the justice. heritage to provide this evening's lecture. please join me in welcoming the honorable anthony kennedy. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. good afterno
, lack of a better term, triball rivalries or the u.s. cooperation creates resentment among another group. they want to develop their neighbors, but not lackees of the americans. there's insight into the impact hispanic candidate -- impact that history's had. they are used to conquerors coming and going so they create a relationship in how they hedge their bets. apart from the human tragedies, your heart breaks reading about someone who had a baby, spoke to his wife before he went on the mission, and then died in a helicopter crash. your heart breaks on the human realm reminding you of the cost. it reminds you the low gist tick -- logistical challenges. >> did it make you regret our approach in afghanistan? >> no. i think it reminds us of the challenges of it. at the end of theday, afghanistan is important and important for multiple reasons. we don't want a safe haven in afghanistan for people to come back and reconstitute the safe taifn. to have an unstable afghanistan where radical islamists are organized is a danger to pakistan and its nuclear capabilities. they are concerned about tha
savings should be used for that. yes, we know that, but the federal reserve and the u.s. and federal banks in some countries have it written black and white in their chargers that they need to consider jobs and economic growth. i am not saying we need to teach our legislation immediately. what i am saying is that we should all think about russia's economic development. our savings should work for the benefit of our country. but the national welfare fund is not investing in the economy at the moment. we have agreed that after the reserve fund exceeds 7% of gdp, we can send how of what is above the level into the russian economy, especially infrastructure projects. [applause] and now, i'd like to say a few words about the necessary adjustments to her earlier agreements. at the end of this year, the reserve fund and national welfare fund together will reach 9% of gdp. this means starting with 2013, after we create the necessary management structure, i suggest that some of the funds and the national welfare fund would start with 100 billion. some say should be even more, should be invested in
a second bite at the apple for bob. >> thank you. we are all familiar with the statistics. the u.s. spends on health care than any other developed country. we hear that continuously. i was surprised to hear at a recent conference exactly the reverse is true when it comes to social support spending for lower income groups. for seniors and people with disabilities. which raises the question in my mind, would it be better for us to try to rebalance our spending in the direction that allow people to stay in their homes, functioning well instead of institutionalizing them. which is very expensive. >> we need to figure out how to spend more sensibly and efficiently in health care no matter what else happens. because it makes no sense. we know that it can be done in a smarter way. the question about how and how much support structures that i will say that most, not all, most of the people who are now institutionalized and long-term care and other settings, they are there because they have multiple dependencies that are difficult to treat. most of the people were who are able to be treated within
requires the government obtain a warrant any time it seeks to conduct direct surveillance on a u.s. person. indirect surveillance of u.s. persons by means of backdoor searches should be no different. no one disputes that the government may have a legitimate need to search its fisa data base for information about a u.s. person, but there is no legitimate reason why the government ought not first obtain a warrant by articulating and justifying the need for its intrusion on the privacy of u.s. persons. our constitutional values demand nothing less. unfortunately, we won't be voting on such an amendment later today. so our reauthorization of fisa will include a grant of authority for the government to perform backdoor searches, seeking information on individual american citizens without a warrant. i believe such searches are inconsistent with fundamental fourth amendment principles. for this reason, i cannot support the fisa reauthorization, and i urge my colleagues to oppose the bill in its current form. i'd like next to speak about a few amendments that i think would make some improvements t
. there are variables that will affect that that we cannot control. with the u.s. does and the international financial institutions do is going to matter. morsi cares about with the international community to cares about him. they are sensitive to that because they need outside support to get their economy back on track so there is a point of leverage. if we can use that i might be more optimistic. but in terms of a long-term goal is, it is islam for a reason and they're going to become liberals. all this talk about post islam is unrealistic because we are talking about deeply religious conservative societies where large majorities maybe they don't vote on the basis of sharia but they are sympathetic to public life and they can empower those elements of society to would push them further to the right and that isn't just egypt we see that in other countries where the democracy doesn't always have a moderating effect and they don't have a more islamic egypt and this could be somewhat liberal if not the liberal. >> thank you very much. thank you. this is a fascinating discussion and i appreciate your won
the european economies as a whole are about the same size as the u.s. which you call bonded debt, or come in a skit involved in commercial paper, bonds and other sources. five chilliness country, only one in europe. that means europe is top-heavy with banks. but that means is if you're a small company and you start to grow, you don't have the capital industry we have. you don't have the diverse sources of capital here. sue eventually give forest to become part of a big company. so you don't get the microsoft and apple on the scale we get in this country. so you look the 1970s. terrible decade. microsoft, apple, oracle, charles schwab, southwest airlines, fedex and others. a capital system can nurture them, get them to grow and be independent companies of the future. so again, europe is a 2%, weaker at 3.5 even though it had the largest economy we have the capital markets to adjust and if government ends of messing up the markets as it does when it trashes the dollar, you get new instruments to come in that deal with it and try to make money off of it. or do you stabilize the dollar? a lot
of breaking and penalized in the u.s. for breaking a law in india. those are the stories we write about. >> host: how come we have not heard about that before? >> guest: some of you have hear. one of them is the case of john and judy, they were selling bunnies in a little down of nixa, missouri, fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said, hey, pay on the website, $9 o ,000, but if you don't pay, in 30 days, you owe us $3.1 million. this is the stuff that your government's going to bull disguised people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they are doing the same with taking people's land and saying you can't build it on it because it's a wetland, even though there's no water or stream or pond on the land. >> as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >> we've looked at some of these things, and we now constructed legislation to try to fix them. like on the wetlands, we say the clean water act says you can't discharge pollutants into waters. i don't have a problem with that, but your backyard is not navigable water and dirt is not a pollutant. we have to redef
, again, piecing things together, "u.s. news & world report," saturday evening, life magazine, look magazine, all those helped me support my story, and with the story, again, of a protagonist that at no time know what was going on, but i put notes in the book so the reader knows what's going on, and the poor 23-year-old second lieutenant hasn't a clue until we fete to, until we get to mississippi and to memphis. sir, your second question, i'm sorry. >> training. >> training. >> what kind of training did you have? >> no. military police, i trained for p.o.w., for prisoner control, prisoners, foreign prisoners of war, our own people. taking them back and forth from the jail to court appearances, things like that. but never protecting, never bodyguarding something. so we had no starter kit. we just winged it those first couple days. and mistakes are made. you keep looking at meredith and not at the second story of a building. not at a window. you keep thinking like a mother watching its child go forward on the street. you keep looking -- well, that's the wrong thing. you don't look at
are placed. and so when he goes out, went also then goes out on surveys for the u.s. government, he's part of that, but there's things he is saying in the photos that make you wonder, when he, for instance, put the rover, ruler underneath a rock that talks about, but has an inscription in spanish that says when the spanish ruled, and then you are thinking come he's kind of making fun of this survey. but the great thing is, we do really now what he thought. >> so, we open the floor to questions. jack, what's your question? >> hi. interesting talk, enjoyed it. is the atrium block still around? >> well, the atrium block is still around. where is it? there was a conference about it recently. maybe a few years ago. but there are pieces of it still around. after the second time kelly founded at the aquarium that robert louis was knocking down, he got it somewhere. a historical site. i don't know now where it is. i know i should have talked to them. i called the baroque historian -- borough historian. >> i want to ask a question. does every borough had a historic? >> i think so. i think there's a
there and to use these funds for increased security at u.s. embassies and other overseas posts identified in the department's security review after the benghazi attack making additional funds available for this purpose is one of the recommendations of the accountable -- accountability review board chaired by ambassador pickerring and admiral mullen. this amendment is a permissive amendment. it is not a prescriptive amendment. it permits the transfer of funds between the diplomatic program and embassy security, construction and maintenance at which would otherwise be precluded due to percentage limitations on such transfers. according to c.b.o., the amendment has no outlay scoring impact. we all want to do -- we all want to do what we can to prevent another tragedy like what occurred in benghazi. the state department has done a review and these funds will be used to expedite construction of marine security guard posts overseas posts to, build secure embassies in beirut, lebanon and zimbabwe. there is nothing controversial about this amendment. these are existing funds. there is no new appr
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17